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RS - Judaism

Below are all the possible exam questions that could come up...pretty much;
 

Social Harmony

 

All these require a short answer and are worth 2 marks:

What is meant by a multi-faith society? 

Give ONE example of the growth of equal rights for women.    

What does the word discrimination mean? 

Christianity is one religion practised in the United Kingdom.  Name TWO others.

What is racial prejudice?          

What is a multi-ethnic society?

           

These questions are for you to show your KNOWLEDGE.  Each is worth 6 marks.

Outline Christian teaching about racial harmony.           

Outline the teaching of ONE religion other than Christianity about racial harmony. 

Outline the attitude of Christianity towards other religions.         

Describe how different religions work together in the United Kingdom. 

 

 

These questions are for you to show that you understand the reasons believers do or think particular things.  You need to use evidence in your answers.  Each question is worth 8 marks.

Explain some advantages of living in a multi-faith society.          

Explain how the teaching of ONE religion other than Christianity may help racial harmony.         

Explain Christian teaching on the roles of men and women. 

Explain the attitude of ONE religion, other than Christianity, to other faiths. 

Explain the different attitudes among Christians to the roles of men and women. Explain how the teaching of one religion, other than Christianity, encourages its followers not to be racist.

Explain the different attitudes towards the roles of men and women, for a religion other than Christianity.

 

These are evaluation questions.  You are required to give both sides of the argument in each question.  The exam board states that you must return to your original comment and draw a conclusion.  Each question is worth 4 marks.

 

‘It is wrong to try to convert people to your religion.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.

 

‘If Christians believed women were equal to men, a woman could become Pope.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.

 

‘Religions should treat men and women equally.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.         

 

‘People should always be treated the same, whatever their religion.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.   

 

‘Religion should do more to improve the status of women.’ Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.      

 

‘Only one religion can be true.’   Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.  

 

 

Believing in God

 

All these require a short answer and are worth 2 marks:

What is meant by religious conversion? 

Give TWO examples of suffering caused by humans.    

What does the word atheist mean?       

Name ONE feature of a religious upbringing.    

Name ONE type of religious experience.          

What does the word agnostic mean?

 

These questions are for you to show your KNOWLEDGE.  Each is worth 6 marks.

 

Outline the main features of a religious upbringing in ONE religion.        

Give TWO reasons why some people do NOT believe in God.  

Outline ONE religious response to the problem of evil.             

Describe a religious experience.           

Outline the response of ONE religion to the problem of suffering.          

Describe the main features of a religious upbringing in ONE religion.     

 

 

These questions are for you to show that you understand the reasons believers do or think particular things.  You need to use evidence in your answers.  Each question is worth 8 marks.

 

Explain why someone’s experience of the natural world may lead them to believe in God.          

Explain how a religious upbringing may lead a person to believe in God.

Explain how a religious experience may lead someone to believe in God. 

Explain why evil and suffering are a problem for those who believe in God.

Explain why some people believe in miracles.   

Explain how a person may come to believe in God through seeing order and purpose in the world.        

 

 

These are evaluation questions.  You are required to give both sides of the argument in each question.  The exam board states that you must return to your original comment and draw a conclusion.  Each question is worth 4 marks.

 

‘Children should be allowed to make up their own minds about whether they believe in God.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.       

 

‘God always answers prayer.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.

 

‘The world is full of evidence for God’s existence.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.

 

‘Miracles don’t happen today.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.   

 

‘The world must have been made by God.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.         

 

‘If   God really loved us, he would not allow suffering.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.      

 

Matters of Life and Death

 

All these require a short answer and are worth 2 marks:

What do people mean by the sanctity of life?

What is an abortion?

What is meant by the word euthanasia?

What is meant by the word immortality?

What is meant by voluntary euthanasia?

What is meant by the word suicide?

 

These questions are for you to show your KNOWLEDGE.  Each is worth 6 marks.

Outline the teaching of one religion other than Christianity on the sanctity of life.

Outline Christian teaching on euthanasia.

Outline Christian attitudes to abortion.

Outline the teaching of one religion other than Christianity on life after death.

Describe the teaching of one religion, other than Christianity, on abortion.

State what Christians believe about life after death.

 

These questions are for you to show that you understand the reasons believers do or think particular things.  You need to use evidence in your answers.  Each question is worth 8 marks.

 

Explain the beliefs of one religion, other than Christianity, on euthanasia.

Explain why some people do not believe in life after death.

Explain why some people want euthanasia to be made legal.

Explain why the followers of one religion other than Christianity believe in life after death

Explain why some people do not believe in life after death.

 

These are evaluation questions.  You are required to give both sides of the argument in each question.  The exam board states that you must return to your original comment and draw a conclusion.  Each question is worth 4 marks.

 

‘Women own their own bodies, so they should be allowed an abortion if that is what they want.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.       

 

‘If my friend were on a life support machine, and would not recover, I would want the machine switched off.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.    

 

‘Everyone should treat life as a gift from God.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.         

 

‘When you’re dead, you’re dead, that’s the end of you.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.      

 

‘The law on euthanasia needs to be changed.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.

 

‘No religious person could agree with abortion.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.         

 

 

Marriage and Family Life

 

All these require a short answer and are worth 2 marks:

 

What is adultery?

What is an extended family?

What is co-habitation?

State one purpose of Christian marriage.

What is pre-marital sex?

What is a nuclear family?

 

 

These questions are for you to show your KNOWLEDGE.  Each is worth 6 marks.

Outline the purposes of marriage in one religion other than Christianity.

Describe how attitudes to marriage have changed in recent times.

State Christian teaching about sexual relationships outside marriage.

Outline the attitude to divorce of one religion other than Christianity.

Outline Christian teaching on sex before AND outside marriage.

State how one religion, other than Christianity helps parents in the upbringing of their children.

 

 

These questions are for you to show that you understand the reasons believers do or think particular things.  You need to use evidence in your answers.  Each question is worth 8 marks

 

Explain why Christians have different attitudes to divorce.

Explain how being a member of one religion other than Christianity may help parents to bring up their children.

Explain the importance of family life in one religion other than Christianity.

Explain how the church may help parents bring up their children.

Explain how the teaching  on marriage in one religion other than Christianity may help a marriage to succeed.

Explain how a Christian wedding ceremony may help a couple make a success of their marriage.

 

 

These are evaluation questions.  You are required to give both sides of the argument in each question.  The exam board states that you must return to your original comment and draw a conclusion.  Each question is worth 4 marks.

 

‘Without religion, family life would collapse.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.         

 

‘There shouldn’t be any religious rules about sex.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.

 

‘If people were more religious, there would be fewer divorces.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.

 

‘Religious people should not have sex before marriage.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.

 

‘Religious parents should send their children to a religious school.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.   

 

‘People should only marry someone from their own religion.’ Do you agree?  Give reasons for your opinion and show that you have considered another point of view.

 

 

Wealth and Poverty

 

This unit is an extended writing unit.  It is for you to show that you can write extended answers, giving detail and evidence.  Notice that there are only 3 types of question in this section, although the total marks available (20) is the same.  The first question is worth more than in previous questions and therefore requires more detail.

 

The following questions are for you to show your knowledge.  Each is worth 4 marks.

 

Describe how ONE religious person, community or organisation helps to relieve poverty and suffering in the United Kingdom.   

 

Name one religious agency for world development and outline its work.  

 

Outline the causes of world poverty. 

 

These questions are for you to show that you understand the reasons believers do or think particular things.  You need to use evidence in your answers.  Each question is worth 8 marks

 

Explain with reference to the teaching of one religion, why the person, community or organisation acts to reduce poverty. 

 

Explain why the followers of one religion would support the work of Christian Aid.

 

Explain how one religious agency tries to remove some of the causes of poverty.

 

Explain how the teachings of one religion might help relieve the problems of world development

 

These are evaluation questions.  You are required to give both sides of the argument in each question.  The exam board states that you must return to your original comment and draw a conclusion.  Each question is worth 8 marks.

 

‘The love of money is the root of all evil.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your answer and show that you have considered another point of view. 

 

‘Religious people should always give to beggars in the street.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your answer and show that you have considered another point of view.

 

 ‘There would be no poor people in the United Kingdom if people took their religion seriously.’  Do you agree?  Give reasons for your answer and show that you have considered another point of view. 

 

‘Only religious organisations can solve world poverty.’   Do you agree?  Give reasons for your answer and show that you have considered another point of view.

 

 

Judaism - definitions
 

Hashem

        Jewish name for God

        Jews don’t like to say God so instead they use another name.

 

Shema

  • Found in the heart of the siddur
  • Most important Jewish prayer
  • Oneness of God
  • Said at every morning and evening service

 

Messiah

              Future leader of the Jews.

              Jews believe he will come and restore peace and return Israel to them.

 

Tallith            

  • Prayer shawl
  • Rectangle – linen/wool
  • Tzitzit (fringes) to hold the ten commandments
  • Worn by men (boys over the age of 13) during morning service, Shabbat and other holy days

 

Tefillin

  • ‘prayers’
  • head and arm piece and black box
  • inside box = shema – ‘Hear O Israel the lord your God the Lord is One’
  • Worn by boys over 13
  • Not worn on Sabbath/other festivals

 

Shofar

  • Rams horn
  • Welcomes in the new Year
  • Blown by rabbi at the start of Rosh Hashanah

 

Mezuzah

  • Doorpost’
  • The mezuzah is a sign which is put in Jewish households
  • It’s a tin parchment scroll containing the words of Deuteronomy 6: 4 – 9 and 11:13 -21 in Hebrew
  • ‘And these words which I command you this day shall be upon your hearts… and you shall write upon the doorposts of your houses and upon you gates’
  • Handwritten by a trained scribe and kept in a case
  • One on the front, and every other, door of the house except the bathroom and toilet
  • Constantly reminds family of the covenants

 

Sukkah

  • A hut built during Sukkot
  • Very simple and open
  • Made of twigs and branches
  • Remember their forefathers during Moses

 

Menorah

  • Nine branch candle stick
  • Lit each day of Hanukah
  • Reminder of the miracle of the oil supply
  • Goodness overcoming evil during persecution

Festivals and their importance

Rosh Hashanah

        Falls in Autumn

        The birthday of the world

        Torah describes the creation of the world in the book of Genesis

        Falls on the seventh month of the Jewish calendar and lasts two days

        God judges his people for the years misdeeds and decides their circumstances

        On this day, people repent for their sins and ask forgiveness from God

        Shows the history as a whole

        The shofar is blown to mark the start of Rosh Hashanah

        This is the crying out of the soul as it yearns to be reunited with God.

        Between RH and YK comes ten days of repentance

        ‘Tashlich’ (casting away) ceremony; a prayer that asks God to  remove the sins of his people

 

Importance =    Helps Jews to reach nearness to God and make them better people.

                        Reminds Jews of the whole history of Judaism especially the creation

Reminds Jews of how God is the creator, and how he is omnipotent judging people on this day

                        Time to reflect on the year and repent for all the sins.                

 

Yom Kippur

  • Most important festival in Judaism
  • Simplest festival in Judaism
  • Everything is white to remind people of morality and purity
  • ‘Day of Atonement’
  • God accounts all the deeds, good and bad, each person has committed?
  • Jews become conscious of how frail they are and to show this they fast for 25 hours. 
  • Men go to the mikveh (ritual bath)
  • Wearing the kittel (white smock)
  • Chanting the Kol Nidre (annulment of vows)
  • Neilah (closing service)

 

Importance =    Helps Jews to reach nearness to God and make them better people.

                        Reminds Jews of how frail they are in comparison to God

                        Removal of their sins in the mikveh

 

 Hanukah

  • ‘Festival of lights’
  • Winter time
  • The time when the temple in Jerusalem was being taken over by the Syrian Greeks and the Jews were being forced to give up their religion
  • A pig, an unlawful animal, was sacrificed in their temple
  • The Maccabees led a revolt and took back their temple
  • They needed to light the everlasting candle that burns in the synagogue 
  • Hanukah acts as a beacon
  • When the temple was returned, a lamp was lit sufficient for only one day
  • Miraculously, it continued burning for eight days until they had made some more oil
  • To celebrate this, a hanakia, an eight branched candle stick is lit

 

Importance =    Reminder of how the Jews were persecuted

                        Reminder of the Jewish history

                        Keep the Jewish tradition alive

                        Big celebrations to encourage children to participate

                        Time to remember God and his miracles

 

Purim

        Takes place in February/ March (early spring)

        Purim means ‘lots’ i.e. to draw lots

        Commemorate Esther

        Haman was chief minister and disliked Jews and wanted to kill them all

        He told lies about the Jews to the king who then also despised them and wanted to kill them

        Esther the queen barged into the Kings presence without permission

        The King listened to her and saved the Jews. Haman was killed instead.

        The book of Ester is read in the synagogue

        Whenever the name of Haman is read out, a rattle is used to drown out the sounds.

        Parties and games are held 

 

Importance =    A reminder of how the Jews were treated

                        Reminder of the Jewish history

                        Keep the Jewish tradition alive 

                        Encourage children to participate with the celebrations.

 

Passover

  • Spring
  • Exodus
  • Freedom of Jews from enslavement in Egypt
  • Ten plagues sent by God
  • He Jews escaped in the chaos of the death of the eldest child
  • House is thoroughly cleaned (like a spring clean) of to remove all unleavened bread
  • This is because the Jews didn’t have time to wait for the bread to rise
  • Mother does all the cooking and preparations
  • The dad and the kids go around with a candle and a feather to see if there are any more crumbs
  •  They have a Seder meal containing the Matzoth, Shank (bone of lamb), a roasted egg, horse radish, parsley, salt water and a glass of wine
  • Play games – mum hides the Matzoth bread and the children have to look for it
  • Sing hymns

 

Matzoth,                      ‘Bread of Affection’

Shank (bone of lamb) Lamb eaten in eth last meal in Egypt    

A roasted egg,             New life

Horse radish,             Bitter slavery in Egypt

Parsley,                       Herbs used to mark the Jews doors

Salt water                   Salves tears

Haroseth                     Paste of apple, nuts and cinnamon for the joy and sweetness after slavery 

 

Importance =    Reminder of how the Jews were slaves in Egypt and how persecution is wrong

                        The Seder meal and all its symbolism (see above).

                        Seder meal and games for the children as well.

                        Time to remember God and his miracles

Sukkoth

  • When Hebrew people were escaping with Moses, they wondered for forty years in the desert
  • Lived in tents made out of branches and animal skins
  • Hard temporary life moving from place to place
  • Then settled in Canaan
  • Celebrates the change in lifestyle
  • A sukkah is built to remember the life of their forefathers
  • Four spices; etrog (citron), lulav (palm branch), aravot (willow), hadassim (myrtle) – as commanded in the Torah (Leviticus)

 

Importance =    Reminder of their ancestors and the way they lived – unleavened bread

                  Celebrate the change in lifestyle

                  Remember when the were persecuted

Four spices remind them of God with their: citron – heart; palm branch like a spine, body; willow mouth, speaking; myrtle eye, see

Books and Holy Scriptures

 

The Jewish Bible is called the Tenakh (TNK)

 

Torah, Nevi’im, Ketuvim

  • Torah is the first five books of the Bible
  • It contains 613 commandments (mitzvoth)
  • Holiest part of the Tenakh as it was given directly to Moses
  • Nevi’im = prophets
  • Divided into two; the former and the latter (e.g. Isaiah, Jeremiah) prophets
  • However, they don’t have a high a status as the Torah
  • Ketuvim = Writings
  • The Three P’s; psalms, proverbs and philosophy.

 

 

Mishna

  • ‘Learning’ or ‘repetition’
  • Began with word of mouth (oral Torah)
  • Put into writing by rabbi Judah in 200 CE
  • Mishna means ‘repetition’ because its nothing new
  • Takes laws listed in the Torah an describes them
  • Contains six sections, seeds, festivals, women, holy things, damages and purities

 

Talmud

  • Talmud means ‘study’
  • Takes laws listed in the Torah an describes them
  • It contains six sections, seeds, festivals, women, holy things, damages and purities
  • It records the discussions that have taken place over the years between rabbis
  • Written in 500CE by two rabbis who put the archives in order.

 

Responsa

  • 11 – 15 century by Maimondes
  • Replies/responses by learned men to difficult questions
  • Revision of the Torah

 

Halakah

        This is the entire range of Jewish law and practice, religious, social and personal obligations

        ‘to go’

        observing the commandments = ‘going’ with God

 

Bet-Din

  • Rabbinical Court (Court of rabbis)
  • Deals with religious matters that are unclear
  • Deals with:        Religious divorces

Kosher food licenses

“You shall appoint judges and officials in your towns…they shall judge the people righteously (the Torah)

Hasidim

  • Ultra-Orthodox and strict
  • ‘pious one’
  • Began 1700 in Poland
  • Led by Polish miracle worker called Rabbi Israel Baal Shem Tov
  • Offered other ways to be close to God other than through studies – appealed to poor
  • Dress in traditional Polish style

 

Orthodox

  • Strict and traditional
  • ‘right belief’
  • Believe that progressive Jews have watered down Judaism and take liberties
  • Many immigrated from Europe
  • Majority of British Jews are orthodox (80%)
  • Torah must be obeyed
  • Ultra Orthodox are known as the Hasidic Jews

 

Reformed

  • Midway between Orthodox and Liberal
  • Began in Germany 1800 when Liberal went too far
  • Stopped praying for the restoration of the Holy Land and the coming of the messiah
  • Messianic Age = universal peace
  • Women have a greater role in worship and modern languages are used
  • Adapted to modern life
  • Torah is not 100% authentic
  • Don’t use the mikvah

 

Liberal

  • Adapted Judaism to the twentieth century
  • Thought that reformed Jews were too strict
  • Apply Torah to the modern life
  • Torah is peoples interpretation of the word of God
  • Ritual laws can be adapted
  • Observing commandments is a matter of choice
  • Torah can be changed
  • Don’t use the mikvah

Sabbath

  • ‘To rest’
  • To commemorate the seventh day of creation
  • In the Torah  - forth commandment ‘Keep holy the Sabbath day’

God created the world in six day and rested on the seventh

  • Social reason -Time for the family to be together

Time to study the Torah

Different from other religions

  • Best cutlery used best clothes worn
  • Preparations before hand to avoid work on the Sabbath
  • Wine and Chollah bread (blessed, cut and dipped in salt) put on the table
  • Starts just before sun sets
  • Mother of the family lights the candles
  • Welcome in the Sabbath with her hands
  • Reads Genesis 2:1 – 3 (God resting after creation) and the family begin to eat
  • Next morning men go to the synagogue for Sabbath service
  • Starts later lasts longer
  • Rabbi reads from the Torah – then read a sermon
  • A group of seven men read from the Torah and an eighth man reads a section from book of Prophets
  • Rabbi gives a final sermon and the service is over
  • First starts appear – Sabbath is over
  • The Havdallah is said marking the end – the ‘going out’ of the Sabbath
  • A final prayer is said over the wine/spices/bread and final one over the wine
  • Sabbath is over

Jewish Way of Life

 

Mikveh

  • The mikveh is a ritual bath about 3 – 5 meters long and 2 – 3 meters wide
  • Used to purify them from spiritual uncleanness
  • The mikveh is used before marriage, after childbirth, after menstruation, men use it on Yom Kippur and converts

 

Death

        Person who is dying confesses their sins on his death bed

        When they die, the family members tear a piece of garment of the deceased

        The body is buried as soon as possible and cannot be left alone

        The body has to be cleansed spiritually in the mikveh

        The body is then wrapped in a linen shroud and placed in a wooden coffin, everyone equal before God. Body is prepared by Chevra Kaddisha  

        Psalms and prayers are recited for the deceased followed by a short speech

        Mud is put on the grave to help the family come to terms with the death.

        Shiva; seven days after death family stay at home and are visited by friends and family who talk about the death and the deceased, Men recite the kaddish

        Sheloshim; 30 days after death life returns to normal; kaddish recited

        Yahrzeit; One year later, tombstone erected, candle lit each year for 24h.

Judaism - marriage

Vocabulary

Marriage                      - man and women legally united and living together

Faithfulness                 - staying with your spouse and only having sex with them

Pre-marital sex             - sex before marriage

Promiscuity                   - having sex with many without commitment

Re-marriage                  - marrying again after divorce

Nuclear family              - mum, dad and kids together as a unit

Extended family           - as above but with grandparents, uncles, cousins etc.

Adultery                       - sex with someone when already married and faithful to someone                                             else

Reconstituted family     - two sets of children become one family when their divorced parents marry each other                       

 

Jewish wedding ceremony

 

   Shidduch, or matchmaking. This means that the process of finding a partner is not haphazard or based on purely external aspects.

   Firstly, the signing and witnessing of the ketuvah, or marriage contract detailing the husband’s obligation to the wife as well as a specified dowry in case of divorce.

   The contract is signed by the groom and two witnesses have to be present

   Next stage is known as the Chuppah. The chuppah is a decorated piece of cloth held outside under the stars as a sign of the blessing given to Abraham by God.

   The groom is accompanied by his parents to the chuppah wearing a white kittle symbolising a new life and the couple even fast as for them it is like Yom Kippur.

   When the bride comes accompanied by her parents, the cantor begin to sing and the groom prays that that his unmarried friends find true partners in their lives.

   The bride then circles the groom seven times

   Under the chuppah, an honoured Rabbi or family member then recites a blessing over wine, and a blessing that praises and thanks G-d. The bride and groom then drink from the wine. The blessings are recited over wine, since wine is symbolic of life: it begins as grape-juice, goes through fermentation, during which it is sour, but in the end turns into a superior product that brings joy, and has a wonderful taste.

   The groom takes a plain gold ring and places it on the finger of the bride and recites a prayer. The ring symbolizes the concept of the groom encompassing, protecting and providing for his wife. The ketuvah is now read aloud, usually by another honouree, after which it is given to the bride.

   After this, the sheva brachos, or seven blessings, are recited and the couple again share in drinking the cup of wine, then the groom breaks a glass by stamping on it. This is a reminder of when the Jewish temple was destroyed.

The Origins of Judaism

 

  • Abraham – he was the first of the patriarch, the founders of Judaism. Unlike his neighbours, Ur, he believed in one God.
  • God told him to leave Ur and go to Canaan, also known as the holy land or Promised Land, and later Israel.  God promised this land to his descendants 
  • God made a covenant with Abraham; this consisted of the existence of One God, the use of animal sacrifices, never human, circumcision of all men and the change of Abram’s name to Abraham.
  • In return, God promised that he would receive as many descendants as there were stars in the sky, and grains of sand on the shore. Among them would be Kings of Nations; God would give them a promised land; Abraham will have a son from his wife Sarah  

 

  • Moses – Abraham’s descendents had to leave Canaan and escape to Egypt because of famine. In Egypt they became slaves,
  • Moses led them to freedom.
  • On the way back, Moses received the Ten C’s. They made a covenant with God that if they kept the Ten C’s, God promised the Jews that they would be his ‘Chosen People’ whom he would protect.      

 

  • Noah – God promised he would never destroy the Earth with a flood again; He put a rainbow in the clouds as a sign of his covenant
  • In return, mans promise was to have as many children, so that your descendents will live all over the earth; and the one thing that we must not eat is meat with blood still in it…the life is blood

 

 

  Zionism

        Zionism is the belief that the Jews should have a homeland – the land God ‘gave’ them. In the Torah it describes Abraham as the patriarch of the Jewish people “God said to Abraham, ‘…I will make you a great nation’…so Abraham went and came to Canaan  

        The Jews lost their land in 6th century BCE when many were taken into exile in Babylon

        They then suffered conquest by the Greeks, and then by the Romans who then destroyed Jerusalem

        For many centuries, Jews lived abroad but then because of the Holocaust the sate of Israel was established. Many thought that this was the fulfilment of the Zionist dream although others disagree. They think that it is wrong to displace the Palestinian’s who were living there; others believe that it is the job of the Messiah to restore the Jews to their homeland. Another reason is that they should try and spread Judaism from different parts of the world.    

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